Collaborating to Save Tigers

Camera trap technology helps identify key habitats tigers use to hunt and breed in the Taman Negara region. Tracked with modern software, the data allow rangers and researchers to map routes for effective anti-poaching patrols. (Credit: Ruben Clements/Rimba)

Camera trap technology helps identify key habitats tigers use to hunt and breed in the Taman Negara region. Tracked with modern software, the data allow rangers and researchers to map routes for effective anti-poaching patrols. (Credit: Ruben Clements/Rimba)

Woodland Park Zoo has joined forces with Panthera to continue the battle to save tigers in the wild. The group will focus on saving tigers in Malaysia, where habitat loss and poachers have decimated the population. The ten year project will provide hands-on training and financial assistance to help save these tigers.

Learn more about Woodland Park Zoo here.

Learn more about Panthera.

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Malayan Tiger Cubs at Busch Gardens

Malayan tiger cub at Busch Gardens

Busch Gardens Tampa welcomed three Malayan tiger cubs on March 31st. There were two males and one female, each weighing around 6 pounds.

These births were part of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan. Malayan tiger births are rare in captive breeding programs. There was only one successful birth in 2012, and this is the first Malayan tiger birth at Busch Gardens Tampa. The animal care team is monitoring the cubs and parents around the clock.

Malayan tiger cub at Busch Gardens

According to the IUCN Redlist, Malayan tigers are considered endangered in the wild. There are only 500 Malayan tigers living in their native habitat, which is the southern tip of Thailand and the Malay Peninsula. Threats include habitat fragmentation and poaching.

To learn more about the Malayan tiger cubs, see BuschGardensTampaBlog.com.

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Tiger Diaries: Sumatran Tigers at the National Zoo

Two Sumatran tigers

Kavi and Damai are the National Zoo’s resident Sumatran tigers.

Will Kavi and Damai hit it off? Will we see babies in the near future? The Tiger Diaries takes you behind the scenes at the National Zoo, following the lives of their resident Sumatran tigers, Kavi and Damai.

In the wild, Sumatran tigers are found only on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Only 400 Sumatran tigers exist today. The National Zoo’s program to breed Sumatran tigers plays a major role in preserving this rare species.

Learn more at the National Zoo website.

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National Geographic Channel’s Expedition Week

Bengal Tiger

A Bengal Tiger caught on a camera trap (India). (Photo Credit: © Steve Winter/Panthera)

From April 3-9, National Geographic Channel is hosting Expedition Week, which features 13 new programs over 7 days taking viewers to never before-seen-places all over the world.

Two of the programs feature stories about tigers:

LOST LAND OF THE TIGER (Friday, April 8 at 9PM ET/PT)

Go in search of an undiscovered tiger population rumored to be hidden in the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan.  This pristine country of lush forests, clear rivers and icy mountains could hold the key to safeguarding the future for these big cats.  But first, the team must trek across Bhutan’s wildest terrain and face its extreme weather — pushing the expedition to its very brink.  With cameras strategically placed, the team is closing in on capturing key evidence of the tigers said to be living here.

Watch a clip of the team reviewing footage from the camera traps they set around Bhutan:

TIGER MAN (Friday, April 8 at 10 PM ET/PT)
A seemingly impossible dream: to create a new population of wild tigers outside their natural habitat. One man, John Varty, did just that. Starting with two young, zoo-born tigers, Varty now has more than 15 tigers at his Tiger Canyons reserve, and has used ever-present cameras to document two years of their lives. Whether mating, birthing or hunting, Varty shows these magnificent tigers with remarkable, “up close and personal” detail. His methods can be controversial, but it’s a gripping, intimate look at tigers as never seen before.

Watch as one of the tigers, Shadow, gives birth:

Catch these stories and more April 3-9 on the National Geographic Channel.

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Amur Tiger Cubs at the Denver Zoo

The Denver Zoo announced that their four new Amur tiger cubs have a clean bill of health. Born May 31st, the quadruplet cubs were the first of this endangered species to be born at the zoo since 2003.

Amur tigers (or Siberian tigers) are the largest cats in the world. They reside in a small region in the southeast region Russia and are also located in small numbers in China and North Korea. There are only around 400 Amur tigers left in the wild, and they are considered endangered by IUCN’s Red List. One cause of their dwindling population is loss of habitat due to deforestation. In addition, Amur tigers are poached, or illegally hunted, for their fur and for body parts that are used for traditional medicines.

Learn more about the new tiger cubs at the Denver Zoo website.

Learn more about Amur tigers by reading Animal Fact Guide’s article: Siberian Tiger.

Amur tiger cubs at the Denver Zoo

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