PHOTOS: New Giraffe Addition to Oakland Zoo

New giraffe at Oakland Zoo. Credit: Oakland Zoo.

A new 13-month giraffe arrived at the Oakland Zoo. Photo credit: Oakland Zoo.

The Oakland Zoo welcomed a new addition to their reticulated giraffe herd. A 13-month old male giraffe, from Audobon Nature Institute in Louisiana, traveled to California in a specially-designed carrier to accommodate his 10-foot height.

Giraffe in specially-designed carrier. Photo by Oakland Zoo.

The giraffe traveled from Louisiana to California in a specially-designed carrier to accommodate his 10-foot height. Photo by Oakland Zoo.

The new giraffe is getting comfortable in his new home, and the zoo has provided different forms of enrichment, bedding, and plants to eat to see what he prefers. He is getting used to the sights, sounds, and smells of the other giraffes in the herd through a fence for now. When the animal care team thinks he’s ready, he will join his herdmates in the African Savanna giraffe habitat.

Giraffe at Oakland Zoo. Photo by Oakland Zoo.

The giraffe is getting comfortable in his new home. When the animal care team thinks he’s ready, he will join his herdmates in the African Savanna giraffe habitat. Photo by Oakland Zoo.

The Oakland Zoo supports the Reticulated Giraffe Project, which aims to learn more about and conserve reticulated giraffe populations in the wild. The reticulated giraffe population has declined by 50% in the past 35 years, and they are considered endangered by the IUCN Redlist. To learn more about Oakland Zoo’s conservation efforts, visit their website.

To learn more about giraffes, see our Giraffe page.

Oakland Zoo Cares for Rescued Tiger Cub

Rescued female tiger receiving extended care at the Oakland Zoo Veterinary Hospital; Photo Credit Oakland Zoo

A rescued female tiger cub is receiving extended care at the Oakland Zoo Veterinary Hospital. Photo credit: Oakland Zoo.

The Oakland Zoo is caring for and treating a female tiger cub rescued by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. The cub was rescued from a private facility where she had sustained multiple bone fractures due to malnutrition. Because the bone fractures hadn’t been treated properly at the facility, some had healed at abnormal angles.

Now in the zoo’s care, the cub was examined and given nutritional supplements and pain medication. Once her bones build up enough calcium, zoo veterinarians and surgeons will determine the next stage of treatment in her healing journey.

“Seeing this young tiger enduring such obvious suffering is extremely difficult…no animal should experience life in this way. We are grateful to serve in a role that gives her hope for brighter days ahead”, says Nik Dehejia, CEO of Oakland Zoo.

For more information, visit the Oakland Zoo website.

Dr. Alex Herman, VP of Veterinary Services, and Dr. Ryan Sadler, Senior Veterinarian at Oakland Zoo, examining a CT scan of the rescued tiger; Photo Credit Oakland Zoo

Oakland Zoo Veterinary Hospital staff performing a thorough examination of the rescued tiger. Photo credit: Oakland Zoo.

Dr. Alex Herman, VP of Veterinary Services, and Dr. Ryan Sadler, Senior Veterinarian at Oakland Zoo, examining a CT scan of the rescued tiger. Photo Credit Oakland Zoo.

Dr. Alex Herman, VP of Veterinary Services, and Dr. Ryan Sadler, Senior Veterinarian at Oakland Zoo, examining a CT scan of the rescued tiger. Photo credit: Oakland Zoo.

Oakland Zoo Cares for Orphaned Cougar Cubs

Orphaned cougar cub at the Oakland Zoo

Female cougar cub during an examination at Oakland Zoo Veterinary Hospital. Photo credit: Oakland Zoo.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife transported two cougar (or mountain lion) cubs to the Oakland Zoo for care after their mother was struck and killed by a car. Oakland Zoo’s Veterinary Hospital staff conducted thorough exams on the cubs, including virus testing, parasite treatment, and bloodwork testing. They also provided vital fluids as the cubs were underweight and dehydrated.

“Our team will be caring for the cubs daily to restore them to full health and for their overall animal wellbeing,” said Dr. Alex Herman, Oakland Zoo’s Vice President of Veterinary Services.

In the wild, cougar cubs stay with their mothers for two years to learn survival and hunting skills. Since these cubs are only 6-10 weeks old, they cannot be returned to the wild and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife will find a suitable home for them in a few months.

For more information, see the Oakland Zoo’s website.

To learn more about cougars, see our Cougar article.

Baby Wallaroo Takes First Hop

Wallaroo joey and mama

First hops! A baby wallaroo emerged from its mother’s pouch recently. Photo by Oakland Zoo.

A baby wallaroo took its first hops at Oakland Zoo recently. Keepers estimate the joey was born in October-November (although it’s impossible to determine its exact birth date). The joey now comes out to graze and explore its surrounding, but hops back into its mother’s pouch for safety.

Wallaroo joey and mama

The joey feels safe and cozy back in the pouch. Photo by Oakland Zoo.

Baby River Otters at Oakland Zoo

River otter baby

Oakland Zoo staff perform regular checkups on the newest members of the river otter family. Photo by Oakland Zoo.

On Mother’s Day, two North American river otters at the Oakland Zoo had lots to celebrate. The two new moms have had their paws full with three pups each for the past few months.

Rose, the younger of the two moms, gave birth to a litter of two males and one female on January 25. A few weeks later, on February 20, Ginger gave birth to a litter of two females and one male.

Zoo staff has been monitoring the pups and administering regular checkups to ensure they are in good health. The pups have remained off exhibit while they nurse, grow, and learn to swim. (Swimming is not instinctual for otter pups.)

River otter baby

Photo by Oakland Zoo.

Baby river otter

Photo by Oakland Zoo.

Baby river otter

Photo by Oakland Zoo.

Baby River otter

Photo by Oakland Zoo.

To learn more, visit the Oakland Zoo website.

 

Oakland Zoo Welcomes a Baby Baboon

Baby Akila, a Hamadryas baboon, was born on November 15 to parents Martijn and Maya at Oakland Zoo. “Akila” is a Swahili word meaning “intelligent.” Little Akila spends most of her time nursing and clinging to her mother’s back. She has four rambunctious older siblings.

Baby baboon and parents

Baby Akila, a Hamadryas baboon, was born on November 15 to parents Martijn and Maya.

The zoo also acquired two new male baboons from Prospect Park Zoo. The two 2-year-old newcomers, Milo and Kusa, are fitting in well with the troop at Oakland Zoo.

“The introductions are going wonderfully,” said Margaret Rousser, Zoological Manager at Oakland Zoo. “We didn’t expect it to go so quickly or smoothly, but we were pleasantly surprised. The great thing about baboons is that they are very family oriented and since the new boys are not sexually mature yet, Martijn has accepted them pretty easily.”

Learn more at the Oakland Zoo website.

Name a Baby Baboon

Baby baboon

Name this baby baboon! Photo by Oakland Zoo.

Two baby baboons (male and female) were born at the Oakland Zoo recently. The female baby hamadryas baboon, born on March 14, was named Kabili, which is Swahili for honest and brave. The male hamadryas baboon was born on April 1 and the zoo is asking for your help in naming him!

To vote for your favorite name, visit the Oakland Zoo naming contest page, and select from three options:

  • Muriu (pronounced Mahroo), which means Son
  • Maliki, which means King
  • Mazi, which means Sir
Baby baboons and mothers

The two baby baboons are integrating well into the harem at the zoo. Photo by Oakland Zoo.

The two newest members of the baboon harem at the zoo are doing well. “All of the youngsters are part of the same harem,” said Senior Keeper Adrienne Mrsny of Oakland Zoo. “The siblings are very curious about the new babies and with the mothers’ permissions will look at the babies, often trying to groom or play with them. Kabili is living up to her name (Swahili for brave) by following her much older sisters in climbing and walking around to explore the exhibit. The baby male spends much of his time gazing at the world around him as he holds onto his mom; he took his first steps during his second day on exhibit.”

In the wild, hamadryas baboons inhabit Ethiopia, Somalia, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen.  Ancient Egyptians worshipped hamadryas baboons as the incarnation of their god Thoth.

To learn more about the baby baboons, visit the Oakland Zoo website.

Confiscated Snakes Find New Home

Amazon tree boa

Photo by Oakland Zoo.

Oakland Zoo took in three Amazon tree boas after the snakes were confiscated by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The smuggled snakes could not be returned to the wild after they were taken from South America and illegally imported into the Port of Miami.

“Animals illegally imported from the wild and into the pet trade are subjected to horrific conditions during the transport including overcrowding, extreme temperatures, and little to no sanitation, leading to a very low survival rate,” said Margaret Rousser, Zoological Manager at Oakland Zoo. “This is also a primary cause of many species becoming endangered. When looking for pet reptiles or birds, owners should only purchase animals that are captive bred and ensure that they are dealing with a reputable source. The best option is to work with a rescue organization.”

Guests to the zoo can see the new snakes at the Reptile and Amphibian Discovery Room daily from 10am-4pm.

In the wild, Amazon tree boas are common in forests with high humidity, like the Amazon rainforest. They also inhabit dry areas, like savannas or dry forests, and along rivers. They hunt at night using infrared sensitivity and during the day using vision. While they are aggressive in nature, they are non-venomous.

Christmas Trees Become Zoo Animal Treats

Elephant with Christmas tree

Photo by Oakland Zoo.

Dozens of leftover Christmas trees were donated by a local tree lot to the Oakland Zoo after the holiday season wrapped up. And the Oakland Zoo keepers have put them to good use!

“The Christmas trees provide our zoo animals with a unique seasonal enrichment,” said Colleen Kinzley, Director of Animal Care at Oakland Zoo.

The trees became sticky snacks for the giraffes, zebras, camels, elephants, and goats. They provided hiding spots for goodies to entice baboons and otters. And they added a new dimension of fun to the squirrel monkeys’ exhibit.